As many of you know, my Dad, at 66, succumbed to the inevitable end of his 14 year battle with Alzheimer’s disease. It’s been a long, arduous journey and he fought for his life like a true warrior until the very end. I was given the unique gift of being able to be with him to take his last breath, to place my ear on his chest in a dark and quiet room and listen to his last heartbeat. With tears in my eyes, in awe of the awesome and uncompromising power death has over all of us, I witnessed as he embarked on that journey we all will one day take into the void of the great hereafter. It's humbling, grounding and forces you to grow a new perspective on life. – I am further humbled by the beautiful outcry of support for my family and me during this transitional time as we learn to live without him in our physical lives. Your support has meant the world to us and has sparked memories that sat dormant for so many years. Memories that ultimately defined his life and help us heal and move forward to face another day with courage and grace. 

As many of you know, my Dad, at 66, succumbed to the inevitable end of his 14 year battle with Alzheimer’s disease. It’s been a long, arduous journey and he fought for his life like a true warrior until the very end. I was given the unique gift of being able to be with him to take his last breath, to place my ear on his chest in a dark and quiet room and listen to his last heartbeat. With tears in my eyes, in awe of the awesome and uncompromising power death has over all of us, I witnessed as he embarked on that journey we all will one day take into the void of the great hereafter. It's humbling, grounding and forces you to grow a new perspective on life. – I am further humbled by the beautiful outcry of support for my family and me during this transitional time as we learn to live without him in our physical lives. Your support has meant the world to us and has sparked memories that sat dormant for so many years. Memories that ultimately defined his life and help us heal and move forward to face another day with courage and grace. 

 

The links below chronical, in part, some of the moments I have witnessed and wish to share with anyone struggling with a loved one with dementia. Note that this section of the website is a work in progress. Much of the content, as of now, is difficult to address and publish but as time passes, I will be adding additional material for viewing so please check back regularly.

In 1998, at 50 years old, my father was diagnosed with early onset alzheimer’s. The family immediately had to sell his car and downsize to a smaller, more modest home. He was forced to retire from his successful career of 30 years and make preparations for the long journey that was to come. I chronicled this journey.

Since then our family has cried, laughed and grown closer as a single unit. We all feel the same loss but cope in different and unique ways. We have learned the value of unconditional love and been able to lean on each other in times of hurt and need. 

In February of 2010 my mother gained the strength to find a perminant home for my dad in which he would be more comfortable as his need had become greater than what one person could provide. The strength and courage that lies within my struggling mother's heart is astounding and the loss she is experiencing is insurmountable.

We all make regular visits to see my father as much as possible. 

Still, although he my not know exactly who I am, whenever my father sees me walk into the room, he comes running at me with tears rolling down his cheek ready to embrace his son in his long, loving arms. And as I wrap my arms around his tall, delicate body, I still feel the same comforting warmth of hugging my dad as I did when I was a little boy.

 

Screen Shot 2013-03-13 at 4.14.09 PM.jpg